WELCOME TO

ANGUILLA

“Unity, Strength and Endurance"

Fond Welcome to Locals and Visitors

Each and every visit to the Caribbean is like no other. There is always something new to learn, places to go or things to do. Sculpted by nature, the islands are ever-changing and evolving. With so many islands to choose from it is never easy to decide on where to stop.
We want to introduce you to our beautifully unique islands. Make sure you stay a while, take your time! In the Caribbean there’s no rush, let’s just ‘go with the flow’.
The more you learn, the more you will want to know, so relax and discover

the wonderful Island of Anguilla

ANGUILLA-FLAG

As a British overseas territory, Anguilla uses the Union Jack as its official flag.  The flag depicted is the unofficial flag of Anguilla. It was adopted on 30th May, 1990. It is the country’s fifth flag since 1957.

The Anguillan flag is blue with a British Union Jack flag in the top left corner and the coat of arms on the right. The country uses the British Flag in its flag, to represent the remaining connection between the island and Britain. The coat of arms consists of three orange dolphins on a white background with blue water beneath.

Anguilla-Coats_of_ArmsAnguilla’s coat of arms consists of three dolphins jumping out of the sea. The dolphins are orange, this symbolises endurance, unity and strength, which are the words used in the island’s motto. The circular motion represents continuity.

The white background of the coat of arms depicts peace and tranquility. The blue base represents the sea, as well as faith, youth and hope.

God Bless Anguilla

Nurture and keep her,

Noble and beauteous

She stands midst the sea,

Oh land of the happy

A haven we’ll make thee

Our lives and love

We give unto thee

With heart and soul

We’ll build a nation

Proud, strong and free,

We’ll love her, hold her,

Dear to our hearts for eternity

Let truth and right,

our banner be,

We’ll march ever on

Mighty we’ll make her

Long may she prosper

God grant her leaders

Wisdom and grace

May glory and honour

Ever attend her,

Firm shall she stand,

Throughout every age

tim-foyTIM FOY OBE

GOVERNOR
 
 
 

victor-banksVICTOR BANKS

CHIEF MINISTER

Governors

 
 

CHARLES HENRY GODDEN

TOOK OFFICE: 1982 – LEFT OFFICE: 1983

 

ALASTAIR TURNER BAILLIE

TOOK OFFICE: 1983 – LEFT OFFICE: 1987

 

GEOFFREY OWEN WHITTAKER

TOOK OFFICE: 1987 – LEFT OFFICE: 1989

 

BRIAN GEORGE J CANTY

TOOK OFFICE: 1989 – LEFT OFFICE: 1992

 

ALAN WILLIAM SHAVE

TOOK OFFICE: 1992 – LEFT OFFICE: 1995

 

ALAN NORMAN HOOLE

TOOK OFFICE: 1995 – LEFT OFFICE: 1996

 

ROBERT HARRIS

TOOK OFFICE: 1996 – LEFT OFFICE: 2000

 

PETER JOHNSTONE

TOOK OFFICE: 2000 – LEFT OFFICE: 2004

 

ALAN HUCKLE

TOOK OFFICE: 2004 – LEFT OFFICE: 2006

 

ANDREW GEORGE

TOOK OFFICE: 2006 – LEFT OFFICE: 2009

 

ALISTAIR HARRISON

TOOK OFFICE: 2009 – LEFT OFFICE: 2013

 

CHRISTINA SCOTT

TOOK OFFICE: 2013 – LEFT OFFICE: 2017

 

TIM FOY

TOOK OFFICE: 2017 – INCUMBENT

 

Chief Ministers

 
 

RONALD WEBSTER

(1926–2016)

TOOK OFFICE: 10/02/1976 – LEFT OFFICE: 01/02/1977

 

EMILE GUMBS

(1928–2018)

TOOK OFFICE: 01/02/1977 – LEFT OFFICE: 05/1980

 

RONALD WEBSTER

(1926–2016)

TOOK OFFICE: 05/1980 – LEFT OFFICE: 12/03/1984

 

EMILE GUMBS

(1928–2018)

TOOK OFFICE: 12/03/1984 – LEFT OFFICE: 16/03/1994

 

HUBERT HUGHES

(1933–)

TOOK OFFICE: 16/03/1994 – LEFT OFFICE: 06/03/2000

 

OSBOURNE FLEMING

(1940–)

TOOK OFFICE: 06/03/2000 – LEFT OFFICE: 16/02/2010

 

HUBERT HUGHES

(1933–)

TOOK OFFICE: 16/02/2010 – LEFT OFFICE: 23/04/2015

 

VICTOR BANKS

(1947–)

TOOK OFFICE: 23/04/2015 – INCUMBENT

ANGUILLA MUST STOPS

  • SHOAL BAY
  • SANDY GROUND
  • WALLBLAKE HOUSE
  • HERITAGE MUSEUM

 

Home to bright beach bars, blinding white sands and electric turquoise seas.Umbrellas and beach chair vendors pitched along the beautiful stretch of warm sand. Patrons are attracted to snorkelling at the coral reef, scuba diving and glass bottom boat tours. While many of Anguilla’s beaches have been mentioned among the world’s best time and time again, none so much as Shoal Bay — “The world’s best beach”.

Photo credit: David Jones

Information courtesy of ivisitanguilla.com


Sandy Ground is “the entertainment capital of Anguilla.”  A sleepy village by day, at night the imaginative beach bars, and fun and casual restaurants come alive with music, dancing and lively conversation.

At night the popular “Pumphouse” jams with dancing, drinking and fun, but by day The Old Salt Factory & Pumphouse is a historic site that showcases the once thriving salt economy.

During holidays, Sandy Ground hops all day.  Whether you come down to “lime” (hang out) or “mash sand” (dance), it is usually the place to be, and to be yourself.

Photo Credit: Anguilla Girl

Information courtesy of ivisitanguilla.com

The only standing “Plantation House” on Anguilla, The Wallblake House is situated on the Western edge of The Valley next to Anguilla’s Catholic Church. The Catholic Church now uses the House as a rectory. Wallblake house is located across from The Old Cotton Gin, this part of our capital houses some of Anguilla’s more colourful and interesting architecture.

Photo credit: Josveek Huligar

Information courtesy of ivisitanguilla.com

Colville Petty, O.B.E. is Anguilla’s historian and the curator of the island’s Heritage Museum. Mr. Petty has collected and preserved much of the island’s history, from the Arawak Indians to last year’s Calypso King’s photo. His collection is extensive, hands on and unique.  Mr. Petty’s museum is located by East End Pond. If you’re going to visit, be sure to call ahead.  His personal accounts, enthusiastic interest and vast knowledge of Anguilla make the experience very worthwhile.

Photo credit: Susie Wellendorf

Information courtesy of ivisitanguilla.com

History of Anguilla

Approximately 4000 years ago, the Amerindians first1781_Lodge_Map_of_St._Bart_Anguilla_St._Martins_Leeward_Islands_West_Indies arrived from South America. Living off the sea and the land, they established farms and villages on Anguilla.

Over the following three thousand years, a succession of tribes and cultures called the island home. One such group was the Arawak people. 

In 1650, English settlers arrived and colonised Anguilla. They established plantations where corn and tobacco were grown. 

In 1666, the French took over the island for a brief period of time.  However, it was returned to Britain the following year under the Treaty of Breda.

Like most of the Caribbean, Anguilla was thriving as a plantation economy by the 1800s. Rum, sugar, cotton, indigo, fustic and mahogany were its chief exports. Unreliable rainfall made conditions for farming unfavourable. As a result, the size and strength of these plantations dwindled, and fewer people were employed. 

By 1958, St. Kitts, Nevis, and Anguilla became part of the Federation of the West Indies. This Federation collapsed in 1962 and as a result most of the islands developed individual constitutions. St. Kitts, Nevis, and Anguilla together made an associated statehood.  This political decision sparked the Anguilla Revolution because Anguilla desired its independence from the state.

30th May 1967 is celebrated annually as Anguilla Day, commemorating the repulsion of the Royal St. Kitts Police Force from the island. Britain intervened, and a peacekeeping committee was established. Debates over Anguilla’s secession continued to be negotiated for over a decade, and on 19th December 1980, Anguilla became a separate Dependent Territory with some measure of autonomy in government.

Anguillans today celebrate their independence and their heritage of strength, survival, and determination with Church services, uniformed parades, cultural performances and, of course, the traditional round-the-island boat race.